Posts Tagged servant leadership

Attack Never Defend: An Entrepreneur’s Key to Success


Entrepreneurs do best in the face of uncertain conditions, but mature firms have a hard time with uncertain conditions because they plan for what is certain and has worked for them in the past. Entrepreneurs can succeed by doing what they do best and creating uncertain conditions for mature competitors.

ImproMed is one such company that has made “attack never defend” its mantra. Ron Detjen, ImproMed’s founder and president, says his company continues to grow and add employees because it keeps a competitive attitude. Detjen argues companies that go on the defensive can never grow as fast as companies that go on the offensive. Detjen encourages his employees to go on the offensive by finding something they excel at and keep working on it (Anonymous, 2011). What an excellent approach!

ImproMed is a company that helps veterinary practices deal with complex recordkeeping needs and has developed the world’s leader software products for both the business and medical needs of veterinary practices. ImproMed stresses a consultative approach for its employees is the key to its extraordinary growth (Anonymous, 2011).

A company that focuses on what its employees do well wins. Employees are critical to a small company because they are responsible for how the company performs. Encouraging employees to focus on strengths puts competitors at a distinct disadvantage because they do not know what to expect. A good entrepreneur works from his or her strengths and not weaknesses.

How does your company attack? I would love to hear your comments. If you want to know more about how you can design a way to attack using strengths you can learn more here.

References

Anonymous. (2011). 2011 Winners small business success stories Corporate Report Wisconsin, 26(7), 30-35. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/864104598?accountid=35812

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Qualities of a Successful Entrepreneur


The story of Tariq Farid provides some insight on the qualities one needs to become a successful entrepreneur. Tariq is a Pakistani American who emigrated to the United States at age 11 with his family. By the age of 17 Tariq owned a flower shop with the support and encouragement of his family. Two years later Tariq successfully operated four stores. Making a better experience for his customers thrust Tariq’s drive that led to him to create point of sale software for the floral industry. Tariq later founded and led NetSolace, Inc., which provides franchise management solution software. In 1999, Tariq’s thirst for starting new businesses propelled him to start Edible Arrangements®, a franchise organization providing fruit bouquets, which grew to over 1,100 stores worldwide (Crowley, 2012).

Tariq developed his leadership style from the values instilled by his family while growing up. These values included honesty, integrity, and passion. Tariq believed in preserving these values and always returns to these basic values. For example, Tariq responded to an interview explaining how his drive comes from keeping honest with the consumer and himself. Tariq said he believe a true entrepreneur has a focus not so much on making money, but on keeping a social consciousness and providing for long-term profitability. According to Tariq the successful entrepreneur strives to do better and take care of the customer. Passion is the main motivation of the true entrepreneur not making money (Crowley, 2012).

Another striking characteristic of the successful entrepreneur is to embrace change because people enjoy new and unique products. Tariq believes in rethinking everything to stay on cusp. Tariq likes to employ people who embrace new ideas and who serve as change agents to customize products to people’s evolving needs (Crowley, 2012).

One other idea Tariq’s parents instilled in him is to work hard and go after the American dream. Success does not come easy. A person must work hard to become successful. Tariq realized he must work hard to confront risks and overcome them. Successful entrepreneurs must pay their dues and embrace a willingness to make mistakes (Crowley, 2012).

In short, genuine entrepreneurs are ” leaders who lead with purpose, values, and integrity; leaders who build enduring organizations, motivate their employees to provide superior customer service, and create long-term value for shareholders” (Crowley, 2012; George & Sims, 2003, p. 3).  Tariq Farid provides an example of an authentic entrepreneurial leader. Do you have what it takes to become an authentic entrepreneurial leader? Do you want to learn more?

References

Crowley, K. (2012). CEO perspective: Entrepreneurship with a point of view. South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, 1(2), 177-182. doi: 10.1108/20454451211252714

George, W., & Sims, P. (2003). Authentic Leadership: Rediscovering the Secrets to Creating Lasting Value. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

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Small Business Risk Taking: History Repeats Itself


“History repeats itself” is a saying I hear on occasion and often wonder about. Today, for example, some businessmen say they cannot work because of uncertain conditions, yet Adam Smith designed capitalism as the “epitome of risk taking” (Bernstein, 1996, p. 19). According to Bernstein, up to the time of the reformation, the stable Protestant tradition stressed abstinence to avoid risk. Protestants considered the danger inherent in risk-taking as akin to gambling. Adam Smith (1904) introduced capitalism believing the danger attached to risk also came with opportunity. Instead of looking at risk as a zero-sum game where someone wins and someone loses, Smith believed trade resulted in a mutually worthwhile pursuit. Smith believed both parties to trade and risk taking could become wealthier contrary to practice before the reformation that relied on exploitation to gain wealth (Bernstein, 1996).

Recent conversations have talked about how unacceptable the transfer of wealth is from the elite to its underlings. Some business people espouse the pre-reformation idea that wealth transfer should only come from exploitation of underlings, while others see wealth transfer more like Adam Smith did. Smith believed business is risky, but full of opportunity and new wealth came to those adventuresome people willing to innovate (Bernstein, 1996). Today with the coming of supply-side economics, some want to return to the days of exploitation and stymie adventuresome entrepreneurs willing to innovate and create new trade. Does history repeat itself? Has the pendulum swung too far in the wrong direction?

I believe an efficient economic system has to balance opportunities with risk taking. If business people do not take risk, I do not see where innovation comes from under such conditions. Stable well-established businesses do not like to remove themselves from their comfort zone and their products and services eventually become stale and do not satisfy consumer needs. Meanwhile, society needs to provide more incentives to entrepreneurs to innovate and create new trade.

What do you think? Is our economic system returning to the stable pre-reformation days bereft of any risk taking relying solely on exploitation? Are you willing to take a risk in today’s economic setting? What incentives do you believe would help entrepreneurs to resume their efforts to innovate new trade? Please leave your thoughts here. Do you want to know more about incentives to small business entrepreneurship to its rightful role? Click here.

References

Bernstein, P. L. (1996). Against the gods: The remarkable story of risk. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Smith, A. (1904). The wealth of nations (5th ed.). London: UK: Methuen & Co., Ltd.

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Small Business 101: Lessons Learned from the Dog


 

One of the most important ways for entrepreneurs to learn is to watch others, and what better way than to learn than from watching the pets we love. I have learned so much from my dog, a yellow Labrador retriever, and I want to share some of the tricks I learned from her. Abby is my most loyal and obedient partner and I value the lessons she has taught me. I hope you can learn from what she taught me.

One of the first tasks an entrepreneur needs to learn is how to hunt when hungry. Abby has the distinct ability to sense when she needs a meal. She knows how to hunt and find food to satisfy her appetite. An entrepreneur is hungry often when first starting out and must also find a way to hunt to satisfy the urge to eat. Too often I find entrepreneurs taking hunting for granted mistakenly believing hunting is not an important task, but I find hunting is one of the most basic primal tasks an entrepreneur has. Good entrepreneurs learn to hunt early and often because they  need to eat to prolong their existence. Hunt if you want to survive.

Abby also taught me to keep digging. An entrepreneur’s work is never done and to find what one needs one must always keep digging and not let obstacles stand in the way. If a fence or roadblock exists dig under it and find the way to what you need. An entrepreneur never knows what he or she might find, but keep digging and the treasure will come. Dig to find your way.

Another trick I learned from Abby is to keep my sights high. You never know what might drop from the sky. I have seen Abby look at the squirrels on the fence or in the trees and one misstep causes them to drop to the ground in striking distance. I have seen the same result when Abby kept an eye on the birds that did not leave themselves enough room to climb back up and dropped to the ground. Entrepreneurs should keep their sights high as no one knows if something good will drop in their lap. Keep up your head and salvage what drops from the sky.

On a related note, I also learned from Abby to make my presence known. Abby lets me know she is there and if something falls from my grasp she is there to reclaim it. Squatters rights matters! The entrepreneur can also claim something that falls from a competitor or supplier’s grasp and use it to make life better. Claim the prize by making your presence known.

Once Abby claims a prize she also never lets go. Once the squatter’s rights rule takes effect, entrepreneurs need to hold on to what they have gained presuming it has value.  If the entrepreneur fails to protect the prize the same can happen to the entrepreneur that happened to the competitor or supplier. Never let go if you want to keep the prize.

Similarly, Abby taught me to keep an eye on the prize. If you have not yet gained the prize this step is most important because once you take your eye off the prize, the more apt you are to lose it. Entrepreneurs need to stay focused and continually look for what they are after. If you want a prize bad enough you have to keep your focus. Never let your eye off the prize.

Once Abby finds a prize, she taught me not to waste anything. Waste violates the survival rule as the entrepreneur should always set aside enough for down times. Squander what you find and do not use as it can come in handy when business is down. Never waste what you have, but keep it for when you fall on hard times.

Another trick I learned from Abby is to have a sixth sense and keep prepared. When someone comes to the door Abby is on her way before anyone knocks or rings the bell. Good entrepreneurs need to prepare for the unknown and have a sixth sense. Anticipation puts you in front of others. So prepare yourself by having a sixth sense and anticipating what is to come.

Abby has another natural knack that I learned that has to do with networking. Abby keeps abreast of the trends and setting by networking with her peers. Entrepreneurs need to scan the environment to find their niche and identify new opportunities.  Sniff out opportunities by looking at what peers do!

One other find from Abby’s behavior is to play the game by your own rules. If Abby has the opportunity to define how to play the game she does and lets others play by her terms. Entrepreneurs need to define the rules by which to play the game or risk letting someone else control how they play. Define the rules to benefit how you play and do not rely on someone else to set them for you.

With what I learned from Abby, I have conferred on her the doctor of fine bones degree. I think she has earned her degree and can teach others many good lessons about entrepreneurship. I hope you have found her teachings informative. I continue to learn from Dr. Abby and you can too. I encourage you to act now and learn more.

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America’s First Entrepreneur and Founder


“Content makes poor men rich; discontent makes rich men poor” (Franklin, n. d.).

Ben Franklin is America’s true founder and first entrepreneur and his story can teach us many lessons. Franklin exemplified the supreme risk taker because he signed the Declaration of Independence with 55 other men who risked their lives to forge America’s future. Franklin educated himself by reading and had a reputation as a contrarian, humorist, and adventurer. Franklin used his will to build a successful business and a nation the world would envy (Otto, 2011).

Although Franklin started his life in poverty, he died in great wealth and had a passion for his Christian religion and a movement called the Great Awakening. This movement believed in the welfare of the people and had a contempt for cruelty and corruption. Because of his religious beliefs, Franklin thought politicians should serve the country without pay (Otto, 2011). Franklin also stressed the importance of creditors supporting inexperienced entrepreneurs to foster  representation and build a national culture. Franklin believed in public projects benefiting the nation  and appealed to working-class people (Baker, 2000; Mulford, 1999).

In 1729 after working for his brother James for a few years, at age 17, Franklin bought the Pennsylvania Gazette.  Franklin began publishing the Poor Richard’s Almanac in 1932, which became the most popular publication in America. Apart from his publishing career, Franklin founded the first proprietary library as part of the Academy of Pennsylvania, which later transformed itself into the University of Pennsylvania.  Franklin also helped develop the postal system and became the first postmaster. Beside this accomplishment, Franklin invented bifocal eye glasses, mapped the Gulf Stream off the East Coast, and provided evidence lightning is electricity by inventing the lightening rod (Otto, 2011).

Besides his inventive prowess, Franklin served in the Continental Congress and became the oldest member to sign the Constitution. Only six people signed both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, and Franklin is one of these people. Franklin had an instrumental hand in uniting the founding fathers to sign the Constitution despite some who did not fully support it (Otto, 2011). Entrepreneurs unite people with a common vision and Franklin personified this role.

Ben Franklin saw the greatest vision through in the history of this country and deserves credit for his remarkable accomplishments. Because of his vision, the United States became a great country and a haven for people to gain and respect individual liberty, freedom of expression, and have a government representative of the people (Otto, 2011).  Now is a good time to reflect on the vision of America’s founder. Franklin united the country through his vision and entrepreneurs should have a special place in America because of it. Yet, today entrepreneurs do not have the same esteem despite their role in creating economic growth and jobs.

I want to hear your thoughts on what this country can do to regain Franklin’s vision and return entrepreneurs to the prominence they deserve. Post your comments here.

References

Baker, J. J. (2000). Benjamin Franklin’s autobiography and the credibility of personality. Early American Literature, 35(3), 274-293. doi: 64935335; 1281372; 14371; PEAL

Franklin, B. (n. d.). Greatest Benjamin Franklin Quotes. Great Quotes – Powerful Minds. Retrieved from http://www.great-quotes-powerful-minds.com/benjamin-franklin-quotes.html

Mulford, C. (1999). Figuring Benjamin Franklin in American cultural memory. The New England Quarterly, 72(3), 415-443. doi: 45962354; 1065448; 29070; NEQUA7; PNEQ; 04514915; 99454974

Otto, L. (2011). Benjamin Franklin: America’s original entrepreneur. Leadership & Organizational Management Journal, 2011(4), 132-149. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ent&AN=73204254&site=ehost-live

 

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How a Turnaround is Like Founding a New Company


Once I took a position as the chief financial officer of an organization with a history of over 100 years. The institution in its early years thrived because of its location bordering a city nearly the size of Chicago with a booming coal mining industry. The location bordered on the one of the Great Lakes cutting off half the circumference of the target market.

Eventually, the coal mining industry declined and the city bordering the organization dwindled in population because of lack of other industry in the area. Recreation supplied the next biggest industry in the area because of ideal conditions for snowmobiling, cross-country skiing, and other winter sports. In the summer, the area provided ideal conditions for hunting and fishing. These industries failed to provide enough jobs and opportunities to keep the city alive.

The organization I worked for had its numbers drop by nearly 70% because the organization depended on people within a hundred mile radius of it. When I arrived I found the finances in a shambles and an accumulated deficit resulting in a negative net worth. At first, this condition alarmed me, but I knew I had a calling to turn this ship around.

A turnaround of this magnitude is like starting a new business because it needs a radical transformation. Fortunately, the executive team committed to a radical transformation of finding a new model for the organization that would turn around the organization and create positive cash flows. Weekly we explored new ideas and acted on cutting drains on the organization’s cash flows. In this way, the turnaround is more difficult than starting a new business because a new business does not have to deal with getting rid of existing programs causing a drain on cash flows.

The result of these efforts balanced the organization’s budget and identified new programs capable of producing positive cash flows. When I did my doctoral research I discovered that many companies that go public have accumulated deficits of the same magnitude and about 70% of them eventually fail. This revelation surprised me and I thought about how many companies can use the same help a turnaround expert provides. Big and small companies have similar failure rates. ‘

Although the cause is different, the need to identify a working model is the same. Without transforming an organization by finding a working model that produces positive results any organization will subject itself to failure. This revelation also caused me to think about the benefits of going public versus remaining private. Often, companies go public far before they rightfully should and prematurely remove the founder whose role it is to find a working model.

Public companies start to create more bureaucratic settings, while the organization needs to stay nimble enough to allow the working model to develop and meet consumer needs. Bureaucratization adds costs and reduces flexibility to adapt to make the model work. I believe many companies act too fast to go public because they believe it provides a safety net for raising capital. I believe a slower more deliberate growth may benefit many companies and allow the founders to keep their company and learn how to manage it instead of getting shown the door.  Founders work hard and if they are serious should hold on to their creation and learn how to improve it.

I believe other consultants place too much emphasis on getting big too fast. Companies might do well to slow down and grow organically than fall prey to seeking the safety net of a public company. Slowing down allows the founder to start to see the forest from the trees and build a sustainable model without risking the founder’s position.  

My company works to build organic growth by building on gaining the experience and education needed to grow organically. I believe a serious entrepreneur has an attachment to his or her creation and needs a different focus to preserve an identity with the company the founder creates.

What is your goal in founding a company? Would you prefer to stay involved in the company you create or do you want to exit and put the company in someone else’s hands? Please leave a comment to let me know your view.

If you are serious about preserving your identity with the company you want to create I urge you to try the services of my company by signing on now.

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Dr. Phil’s Fables of Entrepreneurship: Part I


The Falcon and the Pitcher

A falcon exhausted with thirst flew with glee to an abandoned pitcher hoping to find water. When the falcon reached the pitcher, it found so little water that it’s beak could not reach it. The falcon frantically tried everything to reach the water, but its efforts were in vain. Finally, the falcon took a collection of stones and dropped them into the pitcher one at a time bringing the water into its reach.

Moral of the story: Persistence is the mother of invention. Never give up.

The Owl and the Rodent

An owl in great need of food saw a rodent asleep in the grass and flew down and grasped him. Bewildered, the rodent turned and bit the owl a mortal wound. In agony, the owl exclaimed, “Oh unhappy me! I found what I thought a happy windfall only to find the source of my own destruction. ”

Moral of the story: Do not underestimate competition from the entrepreneur as it may prove the source of your “creative destruction.”

The Boasting Traveler

A man traveling in foreign lands liked to boast upon return to his native country about historic feats he had performed in the places he visited. The man exclaimed, while traveling at Rhodes, he had leaped a distance no other man could leap and had witnesses who could attest to his achievement. A bystander interrupted and said, “Good man no need for witnesses. Suppose this is Rhodes. Aust leap for us.”

Moral of the story: If you can’t see it, you can’t believe it! Success starts with vision.

The Ass and the Purchaser

A man wanting to purchase an ass agreed with its owner to try the animal before buying it. The man took the ass home and left it in the straw yard with his other asses. The ass joined another that was most idle and the biggest eater. When the man observed this behavior he took the ass back to its owner. The owner asked the man how in such a short time he could make such a decision to return the ass. The man answered,” I do not need a trial. I know the ass will be the same as the companion it selected.”

Moral of the story: Take care in selecting who you associate with.

The Boy and the Nettles

The boy was stung by a Nettle. The boy ran home and told his mother, saying,” Although it hurts me very much, I touched it gently.” The boy’s mother responded,” that is why it stung you. The next time you touch a Nettle, grasp it boldly, and it will be soft as silk in your hand and not in the least hurt you.”

Moral of the story: Use a full effort in everything you do.

The Ants and the Grasshopper

The ants spent a fine winter day drying grain from the summertime. A grasshopper, succumbing to famine, passed by and begged for some food. The ants asked,” why did you not gather up food in the summer?” The grasshopper responded,” I had not enough leisure. I spent the day singing.” The ants responded in derision, “If you’re foolish enough to sing all summer, you must dance supperless in winter.”

Moral of the story: You must plan today what you will need tomorrow. Never run out of cash, which is the lifeblood of the firm!

The Eagle and the Fox

An Eagle and a Fox formed an intimate friendship and decided to leave live near each other. The Eagle built her nest in the branches of a tall tree, while the Fox crept into the underwood and there produced her young. Not long after they had agreed upon this plan, the Eagle, being in want of provision for her young ones, swooped down while the Fox was out, seized upon one of the little cubs, and feast herself and her brood. The Fox on her return, discovered what had happened, but was less grieved for the death of her young than for her inability to avenge them. A just retribution, however, quickly fell upon the Eagle. While hovering near the altar, on which some villagers were sacrificing a goat, she suddenly seized a piece of flesh, and carried it, along with a burning cinder, to her nest. A strong breeze soon fanned the spark into a flame, and the eaglets, as yet unfledged and helpless, were roasted in their nest and drop down dead at the bottom of the tree. There, in sight of the Eagle, the Fox gobbled them up.

Moral of the story: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. Treat others how you want to be treated.

Please leave a comment about the lessons learned from the fables.  Want to learn more?

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Small Business Entrepreneurship: The Place to Develop Tomorrow’s Leaders


Yesterday I was reading a blog post that said something to the effect the days of true leadership are gone. I was thinking I don’t believe that for a moment. We live in trying times, but there’s no reason we can’t have that good leadership. Although we see politicians taking one side or the other and polarizing people, I see no reason good leadership can’t prevail elsewhere.

I think the place leaders can make a big difference today is in entrepreneurship. I feel this way because I see a void left by big companies whose goal it is only to win. So what can I do about this state of affairs? I can brush it off like many people do or I can help entrepreneurs develop leadership skills so the next generation cares about the world around them and for the people who live in it. So why can’t these people become leaders to make the world a better place?

I get the feeling sometimes when people take a job their companies say, “leave your brains at the door. Here, we are going to do it our way.” I say here is where the politics begin. Working towards a mission takes a strong character to not get involved in politics and instead do what’s best for society and customers. This is the opportunity for leaders to show their stuff.

I would like nothing more than see the next generation of companies personify true leadership that cares. I want to bring these days of win-lose two an end. Entrepreneurship is the perfect place for leaders to develop as they grow their companies and build on new ideas. Entrepreneurs are much closer to the people and society because they have to be. Someday these companies will be the big companies of tomorrow, and I hope they will be better prepared to lead then what we have today.

My goal is to build leadership skills, while helping small business entrepreneurs develop business skills to grow their businesses. I want to turn things upside down and work from the bottom up so entrepreneurs don’t get the same skills they have today. I see a better way! Learn more.

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Small Business Entrepreneurs: Leaders or Managers


I see some of the events going on in the business world today that make me wonder where the leadership is. I believe many so-called “leaders” in big companies are nothing more than managers. What training do they have in leadership or did they just reach their position by using excellent managerial skills? What do these people feel for their employees and for society?

A good example is in the political setting today. I wonder what planet some of these people came from. Some of them use the term leader so loosely it makes me sick to listen to them. I hear too much “my way or the highway” in the political world polarizing the electorate so politicians get nothing productive done. I ask, “How is this leadership?” Leaders collaborate and work well in teams. Do we even have a team working to solve problems in government anymore? Everything I see is a stalemate of polarized views. A leader is not a divider, but a person who unifies an organization to achieve a common goal.

A leader has a vision and uses it to attract followers. A manager simply commands attention by using management tactics to take advantage of others for self-motivated reasons. Often business plans sit on a shelf collecting dust. A leader works his or her plan, but stays nimble in its execution. A leader has a connection with followers by listening and using emotion to win followers over. A manager simply commands people the only way to do something is his or her way.

Managers are many times smart people and know precise skills, but a leader knows how to connect with others and change the way they think. A leader is flexible and wants to know what others think. A manager has a superiority complex because the skills he or she has makes him or her feel superior to others. A leader finds value in finding the right people to learn from instead of relying on his or her own skills.

I see more opportunities for people wanting to become small business entrepreneurs to use leadership. Right now the world needs more leadership and I encourage people with a good idea to exercise their entrepreneurial spirit. A person must have leadership skills to become a successful entrepreneur as a good manager will just not cut it. Casualties are too high for new start-ups so people with an idea and leadership skill have a calling waiting for them as a small business entrepreneur.

Do you have what it takes to start a business? Start by considering your leadership skills. Learn more.

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Small Business: Take the Opportunity to Succeed


Small business entrepreneurs can improve the likelihood of succeeding through experience and education. Many universities have programs for small business and some have entrepreneurship programs. Most of these programs cater to traditional students and are part of a traditional setting. Ask yourself if this sounds like the type of setting that allows you to pursue opportunities or does it stymie your efforts to build the business you are passionate about.

A small business entrepreneur learns more efficiently and effectively on the job, while pursuing his or her passion. Entrepreneurs do their best work trying new things and learning from what they try. A business school can talk about experimenting with ideas, but the ideas get lost or someone else pursues them before the student has an opportunity to act on them.

Entrepreneurs have more likelihood of succeeding by developing a network of experts they can rely on for areas outside their expertise. Ask yourself how an entrepreneur can network in a traditional college setting and find the needed experts he or she can rely on. The best way to find the needed expertise is to experience building business relationships on the job.

The small business owner wears many hats and can easily spread him or herself too thin. What is the best use of your time? What can you farm out to someone in your network so you can continue working on what is most important in developing opportunities?

Do you have a guide at your side? Do you have a coach and a mentor you can rely on? What do you want to get off your shoulders? Contact http://www.apgacademyofentrepreneurship.com/ for a free consultation.

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