America’s First Entrepreneur and Founder


“Content makes poor men rich; discontent makes rich men poor” (Franklin, n. d.).

Ben Franklin is America’s true founder and first entrepreneur and his story can teach us many lessons. Franklin exemplified the supreme risk taker because he signed the Declaration of Independence with 55 other men who risked their lives to forge America’s future. Franklin educated himself by reading and had a reputation as a contrarian, humorist, and adventurer. Franklin used his will to build a successful business and a nation the world would envy (Otto, 2011).

Although Franklin started his life in poverty, he died in great wealth and had a passion for his Christian religion and a movement called the Great Awakening. This movement believed in the welfare of the people and had a contempt for cruelty and corruption. Because of his religious beliefs, Franklin thought politicians should serve the country without pay (Otto, 2011). Franklin also stressed the importance of creditors supporting inexperienced entrepreneurs to foster  representation and build a national culture. Franklin believed in public projects benefiting the nation  and appealed to working-class people (Baker, 2000; Mulford, 1999).

In 1729 after working for his brother James for a few years, at age 17, Franklin bought the Pennsylvania Gazette.  Franklin began publishing the Poor Richard’s Almanac in 1932, which became the most popular publication in America. Apart from his publishing career, Franklin founded the first proprietary library as part of the Academy of Pennsylvania, which later transformed itself into the University of Pennsylvania.  Franklin also helped develop the postal system and became the first postmaster. Beside this accomplishment, Franklin invented bifocal eye glasses, mapped the Gulf Stream off the East Coast, and provided evidence lightning is electricity by inventing the lightening rod (Otto, 2011).

Besides his inventive prowess, Franklin served in the Continental Congress and became the oldest member to sign the Constitution. Only six people signed both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, and Franklin is one of these people. Franklin had an instrumental hand in uniting the founding fathers to sign the Constitution despite some who did not fully support it (Otto, 2011). Entrepreneurs unite people with a common vision and Franklin personified this role.

Ben Franklin saw the greatest vision through in the history of this country and deserves credit for his remarkable accomplishments. Because of his vision, the United States became a great country and a haven for people to gain and respect individual liberty, freedom of expression, and have a government representative of the people (Otto, 2011).  Now is a good time to reflect on the vision of America’s founder. Franklin united the country through his vision and entrepreneurs should have a special place in America because of it. Yet, today entrepreneurs do not have the same esteem despite their role in creating economic growth and jobs.

I want to hear your thoughts on what this country can do to regain Franklin’s vision and return entrepreneurs to the prominence they deserve. Post your comments here.

References

Baker, J. J. (2000). Benjamin Franklin’s autobiography and the credibility of personality. Early American Literature, 35(3), 274-293. doi: 64935335; 1281372; 14371; PEAL

Franklin, B. (n. d.). Greatest Benjamin Franklin Quotes. Great Quotes – Powerful Minds. Retrieved from http://www.great-quotes-powerful-minds.com/benjamin-franklin-quotes.html

Mulford, C. (1999). Figuring Benjamin Franklin in American cultural memory. The New England Quarterly, 72(3), 415-443. doi: 45962354; 1065448; 29070; NEQUA7; PNEQ; 04514915; 99454974

Otto, L. (2011). Benjamin Franklin: America’s original entrepreneur. Leadership & Organizational Management Journal, 2011(4), 132-149. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ent&AN=73204254&site=ehost-live

 

Advertisements

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

  1. Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: